The Wonders of a Camera Sewer Inspection

camera sewer inspectionThe arrival of the new year is a time to reflect on what we are grateful for in our lives. Do you know what Sewer Solutions is grateful for? We are thankful for our Seattle clients. We are also thankful for modern technology that makes our job easier. This includes the video equipment that makes camera sewer inspections possible.

Why Camera Sewer Inspections Are Awesome

Before the days of camera inspections, technicians had to rely solely on exterior symptoms or their intuition to diagnose the problem. This didn’t always lead to the right diagnosis, leading to unnecessary sewer repairs or utility installations.

Modern camera technology is versatile and nearly guarantees an accurate diagnosis. Aside from sewer repairs, technicians also use cameras for inspecting ventilation systems, septic systems, and other hard-to-reach areas.

Cameras essentially offer these three benefits:

Accuracy

Technicians use a camera to view a blockage, root intrusion, or sagging pipe in real time. Most systems are also equipped with LED lighting and zooming capabilities, enabling viewers to see much further into the pipe. Footage is also recorded for playback and documentation.

Cost-Effectiveness

Cameras require minimal technical ability to operate. The camera system itself is also affordable, enabling sewer repair companies to provide inspections at a low cost. Some even offer it for free if clients proceed with repairs.

Cameras are Flexible (Literally)

The repairman can snake the camera deep into the pipe and squeeze the unit into laterals and U-shaped bends. Previously, accessing these deep mainlines was only possible by digging a hole or breaking the drywall to access the pipe.

Fix Sewer Issues This New Year

If you suspect a sewer problem, don’t let it linger into 2018. Contact Sewer Solutions for a diagnosis. Our special offers include a free sewer line survey for all sewer repairs. Our camera sewer inspection process can pinpoint issues with magnificent accuracy.

Edited by Justin Vorhees

Camera Inspection for Seattle Sewer Lines

Serving Everett, Snohomish, Mukilteo, Lake Stevens, Mill Creek, Monroe, Snohomish, Cathcart, Maltby, Lynnwood, Edmonds, Woodway, Mountlake Terrace, Brier, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Kenmore, Bothell, Woodinville, Kingsgate, Kirkland, Redmond, Seattle, Bellevue, Sammamish, Mercer Island, Newcastle, Issaquah, West Seattle, Burien, Tukwila, Renton, SeaTac, Des Moines, Kent, Maple Valley, Covington, Auburn, Federal Way, Black Diamond, Tacoma, Fircrest, University Place, Fife, Puyallup, Sumner, Bonney Lake, Enumclaw, South Hill, Lakewood

Can You Repair a Sewer Pipe Under a Swimming Pool?

sewer pipe under swimming poolA sewer inspection may reveal a leaky pipe located beneath your swimming pool. Does this mean you have to drain and demolish your beloved and expensive pool to access the pipe? We’ll explain how modern technology can repair sewer pipes under a pool with minimal disruption and digging.

How Swimming Pools Damage Underground Pipes

Most pool installers will no longer install swimming pool units directly above a pipeline. However, some older homes have pools right over the pipes. In earlier times, installers and homeowners paid no attention to the pipes, believing they were safe from all natural and manmade activities. They didn’t know at the time that the pool can indirectly damage the pipes. Continue Reading →

When to Repipe a Pressurized Water Line

Repipe Pressurized Water LinePressurized water pipes are a major component in a municipal sewer system. It delivers water from the city supply to your kitchen, bath, laundry, and outdoor irrigation. Homeowners may experience low water pressure in any of these areas from time to time. This may be a sign that it’s time to repipe a pressurized water line.

Symptoms of a Faulty Water Line

Aside from low pressure, does your shower become suddenly hot when someone flushes the toilet? Many homeowners believe this is normal, though it may be a sign of damage. The same is true if you see yellowish or rust-colored water coming out of the faucet. Continue Reading →

Septic to Sewer Conversion: The Process at a Glance

septic to sewer conversionIn our August post, we discussed the difference between a Sewer line and septic system. This time around, we wanted to talk about the septic to sewer conversion process. More homeowners are opting to make this investment, mainly due to the maintenance-free benefits of a sewer.

What’s Involved?

The general gist of the process is straight forward. A utility installation crew digs up the waste pipe located between the septic system and the house and then reroutes the line to the municipal sewer.

The process, unfortunately, isn’t always that simple. Obstructions, such as patios, vegetation, mature trees, swimming pools, and retaining walls might be in the way. The crew may also need to dig up a portion of the public sidewalk. The homeowner may need to obtain a permit in this instance. Our additional services handle most of these obstructions, from removing tree roots to working around existing underground utilities. Continue Reading →

3 Common Summer Sewage Problems

Summer Sewage ProblemsThe sewers are a complex and intricate system that shuttle toilet and sink waste out of your home. Unfortunately, problems can arise, and these problems tend to compound during the warm season. We’ll outline the top three summer sewage problems homeowners and businesses should be privy to.

1. Foul Odors

Small-scale droughts tend to occur during the summer. This means less water running through the sewer line. This increases the chances of waste remaining in the sewer for prolonged periods of time. When rainfall eventually occurs, it can cause the sewer to overflow and bring the stench of waste water to the surface. Continue Reading →

3 Common Summer Sewage Problems

Summer Sewage ProblemsThe sewers are a complex and intricate system that shuttle toilet and sink waste out of your home. Unfortunately, problems can arise, and these problems tend to compound during the warm season. We’ll outline the top three summer sewage problems homeowners and businesses should be privy to.

1. Foul Odors

Small-scale droughts tend to occur during the summer. This means less water running through the sewer line. This increases the chances of waste remaining in the sewer for prolonged periods of time. When rainfall eventually occurs, it can cause the sewer to overflow and bring the stench of waste water to the surface. Continue Reading →

Does Your Insurance Cover Sewer Relining Repair?

sewer reliningCustomers often ask us if their homeowner’s insurance covers sewer relining repair. We always give the same answer: You need to consult with your insurance agent. Even then, the answer is hardly ever a simple “yes” or “no.”

When Does Insurance Cover Sewer Relining Work?

Most home insurance provides some basic forms of coverage, such as dwelling damage, which may include damaged underground pipelines. If not, you can select additional protection that includes sewer failure and drain backup coverage.

However, having such coverage doesn’t mean you’re automatically protected under all circumstances. The cause of damage comes into play as well. Does your coverage include damage caused by an “act of God?” In insurance lingo, “act of God” refers to any non-man-made damage, or in other words, damage by nature. This includes earthquakes, storm-induced floods, lightning, soil disturbance, etc. Continue Reading →

How to Diagnose and Repair a “Water Hammer”

water hammerHomeowners may hear a repeated banging noise when flushing a toilet or turning on the faucet. This occurrence is known as a “water hammer.” The name is derived from the sound it makes, which resembles that of hammer against metal. What is the cause and should you be worried?

The Cause

Water hammering is typically due to a sudden rush of water causing the pipes to bang against the wall. The water rush followed by the valve closing causes an abrupt momentum loss in the water flow. Any loose pipe then jerks from its location.

A water hammer may also occur if the wall studs are loose or if there is a surge in water pressure. In any case, you need to bring in a professional if you hear water hammering on more than one occasion.

Water hammering sends shockwaves through the pipes. If left untreated, the force can cause a pipe in the wall or underground to burst. Much of the relining work we do, in fact, is due to burst pipes, a good number of which are caused by consistent water hammering. Continue Reading →

How to Diagnose a Leaky Drain Under Concrete Slab

leaky drain under concretePipes that are out of sight are often out of mind until something leaks or breaks. How can you tell when a leaky drain under a concrete slab is needs repair? We’ll go over the symptoms and explain why a faulty drain under concrete is more problematic than you may think.

Symptoms of Leaky Drain Under Concrete

So, how can you diagnose a broken pipe under concrete? After all, it’s not like you have x-ray vision. Look for these signs that may indicate a problem:

  • Wet spots on the concrete
  • Cracked concrete
  • Concrete breaking away in chunks

Why This Is Problematic

Moisture can permeate the surface. The water can spread beyond the concrete and into other areas. The flooding can spoil carpets and cause wood to rot and warp. Left unattended, mold can eventually grow inside the walls, cabinets, and plaster board. Continue Reading →

Does Your Home Require an Ejector System?

Ejector SystemIn most scenarios, the home’s plumbing system relies on good ol’ gravity to ensure the smooth flow of waste removal. However, depending on the location of the home—or more specifically, the location of the bathroom—your home’s sewer line may require an ejector system.

What Is an Ejector System?

In most homes and businesses, the plumbing is located underground and downhill leading to the sewer main or septic tank. This allows gravity to do the work when shuttling waste away water from your home.

However, in some cases, the plumbing may be constructed in the opposite manner. That is, with the pipes running uphill leading to the main sewer line or septic. In this situation, utility installers may add an ejector system to push the waste upwards to its destination. Continue Reading →